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Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2017


The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of the 2017 Activity Series, and in collaboration with the Biological Research Society, DCU invites its members, friends and the general public to attend this free lecture.

Tackling ‘The Emperor of all Maladies’; Cancer, a Journey of Discovery from Bench to Clinic

Presenter: Professor Tracy Robson,
Professor and Head of Molecular & Cellular
Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

Date and Time: October 20th 2017 @ 8pm

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, D9

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

 



Free Guided tour of Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens, East Wicklow

 

Saturday, June 17th 2017 at 3pm.

 

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2017

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of the 2017 Activity Series, and in collaboration with the Biological Research Society, DCU invites its members, friends and the general public to attend this free lecture.

Biotechnology and creativity
– reflections on multidisciplinary degrees

Presenter: Dr Siobhan Jordan,
CEO, Interface-The knowledge connection for
business http://www.interface-online.org.uk/

Date and Time: March 24th 2017 @ 2pm

Location: Room X101, First Floor, Londsdale Building, DCU

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

 


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2016

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its 2016 Activity Series, invites its members, families, friends and the general public to attend this free lecture.

Lecture: In Search of Sanctuary!
Is it in the biologist's contract to inform and lead public policy and law
towards environmental sustainability?

Presenter: Brendan Price,
Founder and Director of the Irish Seal Sanctuary

Date and Time: Friday, November 18th 2016 @ 8pm

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens,
Glasnevin, D 9

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS


Lecture: Human Genetic Differences; unravelling which ones matter

Presenter: Dr. Anne Parle-McDermott,
Senior Lecturer in Genetics and Principal Investigator of the Nutritional Genomics Group at DCU

Date and Time: Thursday, October 27th 2016 @ 8pm

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens,
Glasnevin, D 9


About the lecture content:
It's all in the genes, or so they say. The complete (almost) human genome sequence has been within our realm for over 13 years, and with the explosion in DNA sequencing technologies since then, we now have an in-depth catalogue of the genetic differences that exist between individuals.  Adding to this genetic complexity is the impact that environmental influences such as nutrition can have on our DNA (epigenetics), and the possibility of passing such DNA modifications onto the next generation. But simply knowing the sequence of our own genome is not enough; the challenge is deciphering those differences that drive our characteristics, including disease susceptibility i.e., figuring out which genetic differences actually matter? While large-scale genomic projects are striving to address this question, genome gazing is not sufficient and ultimately more gene-focused experimental approaches are needed. The arrival of efficient genome-editing technologies is beginning to pave the way for such functional genetics approaches. This seminar will narrate our journey and fascination with the human genome to date, describe some of the latest findings in functional and epigenetics and provide a glimpse of what the future might hold. 

Dr mary J O'ConnellAbout the presenter:
Dr. Anne Parle-McDermott joined the School of Biotechnology, Dublin City University as a Lecturer in Genetics in 2006 from Trinity College Dublin (TCD) where she was a Lecturer at the Smurfit Institute of Genetics (2005-2006) and a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Immunology and Biochemistry from 1999-2005. Anne completed her PhD thesis at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland in 1999 and was awarded her PhD by TCD in 2000.  She has previously held the positions of President of the Irish Society of Human Genetics, and Chairperson of DCU's B.Sc. degree in Genetics & Cell Biology. Anne is currently a Senior Lecturer in Genetics and Principal Investigator of the Nutritional Genomics Group at DCU. 

Research interests
Dr. Anne Parle-McDermott’s research group focuses on understanding the importance of folate nutrition for human health. Folic acid supplementation/fortification has known benefits in the prevention of birth defects and other human diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanism of how it does this has not been fully elucidated. Research at the Parle-McDermott laboratory aims to decipher the molecular mechanism of how folate plays such an important role in human health ranging from pregnancy to ageing using a combination of genetics, genomics, biochemistry and cell biology methodologies. This research will have relevance for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of common human disease, and providing an understanding of the functional relevance of human genetic variation.

Getting to the National Botanic Gardens  

GPS users: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53 or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

By Bus:
4 (Route Map Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook )
9 (Route Map Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd. O'Connell St. Botanic Rd. Beneavin Rd. Charlestown )
83 (Route Map Kimmage {Sundrive road, Rathmines} / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

For any other starting points in Dublin, use Hittheroad.ie which is an excellent website showing you how to get between any two points in Dublin City, using a smart combination of Dublin Bus, Luas and DART routes.

By Car, Bike or on Foot:
From the south, or City centre: leave Dublin via the Drumcondra road (N1) and turn left at Botanic Avenue (Fagan's pub), just before crossing the river Tolka. At end of Botanic Avenue turn left at T-junction

ALTERNATIVELY, leave the city via Phibsborough, on the Finglas road (N2). Just after passing over the Royal Canal, follow the one way system around Hart's corner, turning right, then left onto Botanic Road. At the bottom of the hill turn left at the traffic lights. The Botanic Gardens are 100m past this junction and on the left.

Car parking facilities (metered) are available at the National Botanic Gardens.

 



Institute of Biology of Ireland

Activity Series, 2016

Come and enjoy a morning-guided tour of Birr Castle award winning gardens and Grounds, including the Great Telescope, and an afternoon visit to Lough Boora Discovery Park.

Date and Time: Saturday, July 16th 2016

Click here for full details


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2016

Public Lecture

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as as part of the 2016 Activity Series, invites its members, families, friends and the general public to attend this free lecture.

The Cancer Epidemic: Food, Pharma and our Future.

Speaker: Dr Robert O’Connor, Head of Research, Irish Cancer Society

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens,
Glasnevin, D 9

Date and Time: Thursday, April 14th 2016 @ 8pm

 

About the lecture content:

Ireland, like all countries globally, is seeing an increase in the numbers of cancers.  There is much fear about the cause of these increases with many looking to our diet and environment as explanations.

Dr. O’Connor will explain the cause of the increases in cancer numbers and attempt to dispel many of the emerging myths regarding the origins of our cancer crisis and how it might best be treated.  He will also discuss how new treatments are developed and the challenges these treatments hold for our health system.


About the presenter:   

Dr. Robert O’Connor is the Head of Research for the Irish Cancer Society, Ireland’s largest cancer charity. The Irish Cancer Society is also the largest charitable funder of cancer research in the state with over 85 funded researchers currently funded across its various schemes.

Dr. O’Connor has 20 years of experience in science and practice of cancer research. He  is passionate about providing the evidence-base to help manage our emerging cancer crisis; focussing on prevention, early detection, increased efficacy of diagnostics and therapeutics and supporting the 170,000 (and growing) Irish cancer survivors to thrive after their treatment.



Getting to the National Botanic Gardens  

GPS users: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53 or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.


By Bus:

4 (Route Map Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook )

9 (Route Map Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd. O'Connell St. Botanic Rd. Beneavin Rd. Charlestown )

83 (Route Map Kimmage {Sundrive road, Rathmines} / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

For any other starting points in Dublin, use Hittheroad.ie which is an excellent website showing you how to get between any two points in Dublin City, using a smart combination of Dublin Bus, Luas and DART routes.


By Car, Bike or on Foot:

From the south, or City centre: leave Dublin via the Drumcondra road (N1) and turn left at Botanic Avenue (Fagan's pub), just before crossing the river Tolka. At end of Botanic Avenue turn left at T-junction

ALTERNATIVELY, leave the city via Phibsborough, on the Finglas road (N2). Just after passing over the Royal Canal, follow the one way system around Hart's corner, turning right, then left onto Botanic Road. At the bottom of the hill turn left at the traffic lights. The Botanic Gardens are 100m past this junction and on the left.

Car parking facilities are available: Hours 1 and 2: €1 per hour; Hours 3 onwards: €2 per hour.

 

Visit www.ibioli.net for more information on the activities and role of the Institute of Biology of Ireland.

 

NCE MSTL logo


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

Public Lecture

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its Activity Series 2015, invites its members and general public to this lecture. Admission is free.

Molecular Evolution and Adaptation: Birds, Bears, Bowhead whales and Beyond !

Speaker: Dr Mary J. O’Connell, School of Biotechnology, DCU

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens,
Glasnevin, D 9

Date and Time: 16th October at 8pm

In this this lecture we will see what happens to living organisms when catastrophe strikes and will also see some important features that are key to survival. We will discuss some principles of evolution and adaptation to ecological niche, and we will take a look at recent research from my group, and our collaborators, on terrestrial, volant and marine vertebrates. Each species is unique at the level of its DNA and every organism has the history of the past locked within that DNA. Studying these molecules allows us to understand the processes and patterns of evolution that have shaped life on our planet for billions of years. We will see what discoveries have been made from studying the DNA of organisms such as the polar bear, the bowhead whale, the hummingbird and, of course, ourselves !" 

Dr mary J O'ConnellDr Mary J. O'Connell graduated with her BSc and PhD from Maynooth University. Her PhD studies were on the molecular evolution and comparative genomics of the human and mouse. After a short period of lecturing at DCU she commenced her Postdoctoral research fellowship at UCC on the evolution of genomic imprinting in placental mammals and in plants. Shortly thereafter she joined the academic team at the school of Biotechnology DCU and immediately set up her research group. She has carried out research at the Natural History Museum London and the Pierre et Marie Curie university in Paris and most recently completed field work in the Amazon rainforest in South America.  In 2012 Dr O'Connell was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for academic excellence for her sabbatical to Harvard University's world renowned Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology where she worked closely with Professor Scott Edwards and his group for 12 months on the evolution of sensory perception. She will tell us about these and other stories in her presentation this evening.

Getting to the National Botanic Gardens  

  • Bus No 4; Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook)
  • Bus No 9; Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd., O'Connell St., Botanic Rd., Beneavin Rd., Charlestown)
  • Bus No 83; Kimmage, Sundrive Rd., Rathmines / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

GPS users: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53 or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

OPW logo NCE MSTL logo National Botanic Gardens Logo

 


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

Lecture: The Value of Pollinators

Presenter: Dr Jane Stout, Associate Professor Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin

Date and Time: Friday, November 13th 2015 @ 8pm

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, D9

Click here for full details


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

Lecture: Canine Genetics: How man’s best friend helps in the study of human disease

Presenter: Dr Kay Nolan, Senior Lecturer, School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD

Date and Time: Friday, November 20th 2015 @ 8pm

Location: Lecture Theatre, National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, D9

Click here for full details


The Institute of Biology of Ireland (www.ibioli.net) invites its members, families, friends and general public to join us on

Sunday July 19th for a DUAL activity day

Activity 1: Guided historical tour (1.5 hours) of Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum at 11.30am.

Activity 2: Guided tour (1.5 hours) of National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 at 2.00pm.

(You may choose ONE or BOTH activities – the choice is yours.
Both tours are family friendly events)

 

Glasnevin Museum and Cemetery Historical Tour (11.30am)
(http://www.glasnevintrust.ie/)

Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum are both the guardians and storytellers for over 1.5 million people. From the ordinary to the truly extraordinary, these people helped shape the Ireland of today. Share their stories and times with the professional tour guides through tours of the cemetery, and a visit to the museum. The Glasnevin Trust is a not-for-profit organisation and all proceeds are used to sustain and improve their cemeteries to ensure they are places of beauty, interest and intrigue.

Highlights:

  • Join us for historical tours though the Glasnevin Cemetery, Ireland's Necropolis
  • Explore the Glasnevin Museum, recipient of the Kenneth Hudson Award at the European Museum Awards 2012
  • Enjoy the museum's impressive Tower Cafe and the Glasnevin Museum Shop.

Admission: €12 pp at the desk. Concession (65+, etc) rates, €8 pp at desk only.  Family rates (2 adults and 2 children, also available. See Web link below. On-line purchases (-15%) (http://shop.glasnevintrust.ie/collections/tickets).

Glasnevin Museum is situated beside the National Botanic Gardens and is linked by a pathway. Parking is available on site, and the museum and the tour are wheelchair accessible.

 

Guided Tour of the National Botanic Gardens (2pm).
(www.botanicgardens.ie)

About the National Botanic Gardens

Located just 3 km from Dublin city centre, the National Botanic Gardens are an oasis of calm and beauty. A premier scientific institution, the gardens also contain the National Herbarium and several historic wrought iron glasshouses.

The activities and role of the Gardens is a great deal more varied than meets the eye.
Our purpose is to explore, understand, conserve, and share the importance of plants.
We aim to make the National Botanic Gardens a place where leisure, recreation and education are all compatible for the enjoyment of our visitors.

Willow at National Botanic Gardens

Willow at National Botanic Gardens

Admission:

  • Non-members of the Institute of Biology of Ireland: €5 per adult, payable on day at desk.
  • Members of the Institute of Biology of Ireland: Free

(Car parking facilities are available: Hours 1 and 2: €1 per hour; Hours 3 onwards: €2 per hour. The tour is wheelchair accessible). Enjoy refreshments in the NBG restaurant.

To facilitate with our planning, please advise if you plan to join us on the day (indicate the tour(s) and give the number of persons in the group), by emailing info@ibioli.net.

Looking forward to meeting you there.
Frank McGourty, Hon Secretary, Institute of Biology of Ireland

 

Getting to Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum (Activity No 1)

Glasnevin Cemetery
Finglas road,
Glasnevin,
Dublin 11

Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum is easily accessed by public transport from the city centre by bus number 140.
 
Find us also at https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zR4GLP_3u6bg.k9N75h4Pn85M&hl=en

 

Getting to the National Botanic Gardens (Activity No 2)

National Botanic Gardens
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
Ireland.

GPS users:
Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53
or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

By Bus:
4 ( Route Map Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook )
9 ( Route Map Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd. O'Connell St. Botanic Rd. Beneavin Rd. Charlestown )
83 ( Route Map Kimmage {Sundrive road, Rathmines} / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

For any other starting points in Dublin, use Hittheroad.ie which is an excellent website showing you how to get between any two points in Dublin City, using a smart combination of Dublin Bus, Luas and DART routes.

By Car, Bike or on Foot:
From the south, or City centre: leave Dublin via the Drumcondra road (N1) and turn left at Botanic Avenue (Fagan's pub), just before crossing the river Tolka. At end of Botanic Avenue turn left at T-junction

ALTERNATIVELY, leave the city via Phibsborough, on the Finglas road (N2). Just after passing over the Royal Canal, follow the one way system around Hart's corner, turning right, then left onto Botanic Road. At the bottom of the hill turn left at the traffic lights. The Botanic Gardens are 100m past this junction and on the left.

For further information on the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, go to www.botanicgardens.ie.

To facilitate with our planning, please advise if you plan to join us on the day (give the number of persons in the group), by emailing info@ibioli.net.

 


 

Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

Rocky Seashore Walk, Rush, Co. Dublin

Saturday, June 13th 2015, 3 to 5pm

Come and explore, learn and enjoy the treasures of a guided walk on the Rocky Shore at Rush. This is a family friendly event.

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its Activity Series 2015, invites its members, families, friends and general public to come on this free, guided walk on a Rocky Seashore.

The Bloomin’ Burren – Flowers in the National Park

Guided by Dr Tasman Crowe,
School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin.

The rock platform at Rush has a wealth of marine life and provides a great introduction to the rocky shore fauna and flora in the Dublin area. It has been the site of a number of experimental studies of community ecology and is routinely sampled as part of a European network investigating long-term changes in coastal marine biodiversity. We will explore the shore, get to know some of the seaweeds, invertebrates and vertebrates that inhabit it and learn about their biology and ecology. It will be an informal visit and children are very welcome.

On arriving in Rush, follow Lower Main Street towards the harbour, where it becomes Harbour Road. We will meet in a small car park on the left (lat-long 53.522616, -6.081853), just after the Harbour Bar on the right, with the harbour and beach in view (see Figures 1 and 2 below).
We will set off from the car park at 3 pm, so please arrive in plenty of time. If we have gone when you arrive, simply walk down the steps to the beach and join us on the rocky shore. We will be there until approximately 5 pm.

You should wear wellington boots or shoes that you don’t mind getting wet with salt water. The rocks can be very slippery so make sure your shoes have good grip and take great care at all times. Bring a shore guide and hand lens if you have them.

Clich here for supporting material (free to download) to enrich your knowledge about this rocky seashore visit.

Rocky shore map

Rocky shore aerial

Figures 1 and 2. Map and image showing location of the rocky shore and the meeting place (from Google Maps and Google Earth respectively). The box on the map shows the area of enlargement in the image.


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

One-day visit to the Greatest Bird Sanctuary in Ireland on the Great Saltee Island, off Wexford Coast

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its Activity Series 2015, invites its members, friends and members of the public to visit the Great Saltee Island, off Wexford Coast.

Saltee islands

Meet at Harbour, Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
for boat departure to the Greater Saltee Island
@11am on Saturday June 6th, 2015.

Return boat departs the greater Saltee Island at approximately 4pm.


Cost of return Journey: Adults €25 pp; Children under 12 years half fare.
Members of The Institute of Biology €15 pp.

If you plan to take part in this visit, please advise us by 5pm on Friday 22nd May 2015 by emailing info@ibioli.net. Indicate the number in the party. Places are limited and preference will be given to members of the Institute of Biology.

The Saltee Islands, St. George's Channel consisting of the Great and Little Saltee, are situated approximately 5 kilometers off the coast of Kilmore Quay Co.Wexford. The larger island Great Saltee is the most famous bird sanctuary in Ireland and is very popular with both day-trippers and birdwatchers alike. These Islands are privately owned and are one of the world's major bird sanctuaries.

The Saltees are a haven for sea birds, nurturing an impressive array of birds, from Gannets and Gulls to Puffins and Manx Shearwaters. They also lie on an important migratory route and a popular stopping-off place for spring and autumn migrants. The Great Saltee also has a breeding population of Grey Seals, one of the very few in eastern Ireland. Up to 120 animals are present in autumn and up to 20 pups are produced annually.

The Saltees are among the ancient islands of Europe, based on Pre-Cambrian bedrock i.e. between 600 and 2000 million years old. Primitive Stone Age man first settled there before history was recorded and carved out an existence. As long ago as 3,500 to 2,000 B.C. there were people on the islands. There is a recently-identified promontory fort, the remains of an ancient grave, an Ogham stone (now in a local museum) and traces of what appear to be ring forts.

Archaeological evidence show that Neolithic man settled there, and traces of religious settlements still exist. Early Christian hermits, Vikings, Normans and medieval monks also inhabited the islands. Small communities of farmers and fishermen made a humble living there.  There is also evidence of buccaneering and smuggling. A flourishing period in the history of the islands was from about 1500 - 1800. The Saltees were in the path of one of the world's most important sea trading routes - between Britain and the American continent. They were used as a base for pirates, wreckers and smugglers. Pirates from Spain, France, North Africa and America plundered the busy merchant ships within sight of the islands. And in the days of sail the waters around the islands became known as " the graveyard of a thousand ships" and the islands their tombstones, so dangerous was the area to shipping. The gains of the wreckers and smugglers could very well be hidden in the many caves which have mysterious and romantic names - Lady Walker's Cave, Happy Hole, Otter's Cave and Hell Hole, enough for any Treasure Island.

In 1798 an island cave became a brief hiding place for two leaders of the Rebellion. John Henry Colclough and Bagenal Harvey. They took refuge in a cave on the Saltee Islands from whence they planned to escape to republican France. They were betrayed, arrested and brought to Wexford town. There they were hanged on the bridge on 28 June 1798. Folklore has it that soldiers saw soapy water coming from a cave where both men were washing which led to their capture.

The big island was extensively farmed  in the nineteenth century. Farming ceased in 1900 until 1939, when early potatoes and barley were important crops. Other crops included oats, beans, onions, etc. Farming ended in 1943.

In December 1943 the Saltees were purchased privately by the late Prince Michael the First. Since his death in January 1998 the islands are now owned by his five sons Michael, John  Manfred, Paul, Richard and daughter Anne. He is buried in the family vault in Bannow Bay, Co.Wexford. His title was passed on to his eldest son Michael.

One of the most spectacular sights on the Great Saltee in mid-Summer are the sea birds colonies on the cliffs to the north-east of the Gannet headland. Vast numbers of Guillemots and Razorbills pack the ledges and create a frightful incessant din which only at night abates a little. The Fulmars too play their part in this splendour. Towards dusk the sight of the Puffins congregating in small groups near their nestling sites presents a marvellous sight.

Permission for day visits to the Great Saltee, by courtesy of the Neale family, is not needed. Permission to visit the Little Saltee can not be granted due to the hazardous landing conditions. However we would like all visitors to respect these islands.

Day visitors to the Greater Saltee are kindly requested to respect the following rules and safety issues. Always remember, these are privately owned islands.

  • Please pay careful attention to the cliff areas as the ground 
    is unsteady and may give way.

  • Please remember you are in a remote location and help might be slow.
  • No camping is allowed on the islands at anytime. The lighting of fires is
    strictly forbidden. 

  • Please take with you any rubbish you might have as rare birds and
    rabbits could be harmed.

  • Permission will not be given for overnight stays to any one at anytime.

"All people young and old, are welcome to come, see and enjoy the islands, and leave them as they found them for the unborn generations to come see and enjoy."    -  Michael the First  ( adapted from http://www.salteeislands.info/ ).

Wear comfortable clothing and footwear, bring water for drinking, a food snack and hat (protection from (angry) birds!!. Bird identification books/charts, binoculars and camera would also be useful.

 

Puffin

For further information on the island, visit the following links:
http://www.salteeislands.info/MICHAEL%20the%20FIRST%20page.htm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_L4vjpGBmo
http://www.discoverireland.ie/Activities-Adventure/saltee-islands/49328


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

Guided Tour, Natural History Museum, Merrion Street, Dublin 2

Meet at 2pm on Saturday 16th May at the National Museum of Ireland – Natural History, Merrion Street, Dublin 2.

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its Activity Series 2015,invites its members, friends and members of the public to this free admission event.

Keeper of the museum, Nigel Monaghan, will take you on a tour of the two main floors of the building. This will take about 1.5 hours.

During the course of the tour Mr Monaghan will discuss:

  • the place of the Natural History Museum in the development of this area of the city, the neighbourhood of Georgian buildings and development of the current museum in 1856
  • the history of the Royal Dublin Society and the collections that make the Dead Zoo popular today with the 300,000 visitors a year
  • the nature of preservation of animals, including taxidermy, alcohol preservation, pinning of dry insects
  • the setting of the building beside the 1911 College of Science, home to what became UCD science departments up to the 1980s when it moved out to Belfield
  • the nature of acquisition of specimens to what is now a collection of approximately 2 million, 10,000 of which are on exhibition
  • individual highlight animals with back stories of bullet holes and tales of extinction.

The building was constructed in 1856 to house the RDS collections and was taken over in 1877 by the state. There have been over two centuries of scientific collecting, and holdings now stand at about 2 million specimens, of which 10,000 are on display.
Parts of the building are not open to the public, but all areas can be seen on the new 3D online visit at: http://www.museum.ie/nh3d (you will need good broadband and an up to date browser to experience this)

An online map and other visitor information is available at:
http://www.museum.ie/en/list/visit-us-natural-history.aspx


Preview YouTube video Nigel - Dead Zoo at:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VunX2u_mQWw


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

The 'Bloomin' Burren – Flowers in the National Park

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its Activity Series 2015, invites its members to partake in this event that is organised by Burren Beo. The IBIOLI greatly appreciates the co-operation of Burren Beo.

The Bloomin’ Burren – Flowers in the National Park

Leader: NPWS
6th  May, 2015
2.15pm @ Gortlecka Crossroads*

The event will be followed by tea and scones at Glanquin Farmhouse (‘Fr Teds House’) for a donation.

Please bring good walking shoes and waterproofs (if needed).  No dogs allowed. The event is open to everyone, although a reasonable level of fitness is required.  It is free for Burrenbeo Trust Members and a donation of €10 is suggested from non-members.

The Institute of Biology of Ireland will cover the donation cost of its members. Members who plan to attend should advise the IBIOLI by contacting info@ibioli.net by Friday, May 1st.

Directions
From the North (Kinvara)

Leaving Kinvara head West along the N67 and take the first turn left after c.500m. Drive c.4km along the road keeping left, passing the graveyard, until you reach a 4-way crossroads (signposted for the Burren perfumery). Go straight through and drive on for c.2.5km, then keep left when you get to a fork. Follow this road for another c.4km then you get to a T-junction, take a left, after c.2km take a right then drive straight for another c.4.5km and you will reach Gortlecka Cross. Park here.

From the West (Ballyvaughan)
Drive South on the N67 from Ballyvaughan. After c.1.5km take a left towards Poulnabrone Dolmen on the R480. Carry on straight for approximately for c.13kms until you pass Leamaneagh Castle. Take a left here on the R476 for c.4.5kms. In Kilnaboy village turn left for another c.2km, then left again for another c.2kms. Here you will reach Gortlecka Cross. Park here.
From the East (Crusheen)

Drive through Crusheen and after 1.2km past the village take the first left turn (signposted for Tubber). Drive straight through for c.8kms, passing Tubber) until you reach a 4-way crossroads (signposted for the Burren perfumery). Take a left turn here onto the R460. Drive on for c.5.5kms then take the second turn right. Follow this road for less than c.1kms. Here you will reach the base of Mullaghmore. Continue along until you get to a crossroads. Park here.

From the South (Corofin- Kilfenora)
Travel to the village of Kilnaboy on the R476 northwards from Corofin, which is c.4km. In Kilnaboy village turn right for another c.2kms, then left again for just under 3kms. Here you will reach Gortlecka Cross. Park here.


Institute of Biology of Ireland
Activity Series, 2015

Dawn Chorus in Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare

The Institute of Biology of Ireland, as part of its Activity Series 2015, invites its members to partake in this event that is organised by Burren Beo. The IBIOLI greatly appreciates the co-operation of Burren Beo.

‘Bealtaine Birds on the Dawn Chorus Walk’

With Gordon D’Arcy
3rd May, 2015
5.45am @ Village Store, Ballyvaughan

The first walk of the 2015 Burren in Bloom festival and the May Burrenbeo walk will involve an early start with Gordon D’Arcy leading a group on a dawn chorus walk. Gordon is a Burren resident, natural historian, author & wildlife artist and will point out some of the Burren’s birds in the early morning light – they’ll hopefully put on a good show. The early morning will be made slightly easier by starting with coffee and a croissant from the Village Stores.  On return from the walk, Logues Lodge is offering breakfast (optional) for the walkers for €13.50 – like the early bird you can catch the tasty worm!

Meet at Village Store, Ballyvaughan at 5.45am (!). Please bring good walking shoes and waterproofs (if needed).  Also bring binoculars if you have a pair. No dogs allowed. The walk is open to everyone, although a reasonable level of fitness is required.  It is free for Burrenbeo Trust Members and a donation of €10 is suggested from non-members.

The Institute of Biology of Ireland will cover the donation cost of its members. Members who plan to attend should advise the IBIOLI by contacting info@ibioli.net by Friday, May 1st.


Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens picture

Free guided tour of Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens, East Wicklow

Saturday, April 18th 2015 at 2pm.

Participants meet at the Car Park

The Institute of Biology of Ireland invites its members, families, friends and general public to Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens, for a Free guided Tour of the gardens with a particular focus on the Spring Floral Displays.


About Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens

Located in east County Wicklow, Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens is the centrepiece of an 18th century estate that once covered over 5000 acres (2000 ha). Seat of the Acton family for three centuries, it is now an outpost of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin. The milder climate, higher rainfall and deeper, acidic soils of this historic Wicklow garden, provide a counterpoint to the collections at Glasnevin. The association of Kilmacurragh with the National Botanic Gardens began in 1854, when Thomas Acton inherited the estate and greatly benefited from the advice and support of Dr. David Moore and his son Sir Frederick Moore, Curators of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin in Dublin. Kilmacurragh provided a more advantageous situation for growing plants from the Himalaya and the Southern Hemisphere and is today famous for its conifers and calcifuges.

In 1996, a 52 acre (21 ha) portion of the old demesne comprising the house, arboretum, entrance drive and woodlands officially became part of the National Botanic Gardens of Ireland. By then the house was in ruins due to a series of disastrous fires.  The following ten years were spent rescuing valuable trees from a crippling tangle of cherry laurel, sycamore and Rhododendron ponticum. (from National Botanic Gardens Web site, www.botanicgardens.ie).

 

Getting to Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens

The gardens are located south of Dublin in east Wicklow, just 3km from the N11 road, between Wicklow town and Rathdrum.

If driving South from Dublin on the N11, you need to turn right at the Beehive pub, which lies c.3 km after the second junction to Rathnew/Wicklow, this is also c.1km South of where the dual carriageway turns to single carriageway.

Keep to the main route, and you will find the entrance on your left after 5 km.

If driving FROM the south on the N11, take the first left after Lil Doyles, a bit less than a kilometre further on, at The Tap pub. Drive c. 2 1/2 km to a T-junction and turn left. The arboretum is 300m on your left.

If driving from Rathdrum, leave the village on the R752, signposted as Deputys' Pass. After 4km turn right and after a further 2.5km you will come to a T-junction. Turn right and the arboretum is on your left after c. 1km.


GPS users

either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: SLP-21-LP9
or input the following latitude 52.9341 and longitude -6.1529.

 

For further information on National Botanic Gardens, Kilmacurragh, go to www.botanicgardens.ie/kilmac/kilmhome.htm

To facilitate with our planning, please advise if you plan to join us on the day (give the number of persons in the group), by emailing info@ibioli.net.

Looking forward to meeting you there.

Frank McGourty, Hon Secretary, Institute of Biology of Ireland
www.ibioli.net


As part of the celebration of its Golden Jubilee The Institute of Biology of Ireland invites you to a keynote Public Lecture* in

The National Botanic Gardens (Lecture Theatre),
Botanic Rd., Dublin 9

Friday, October 17th 2014, at 7:30pm.
Admission: Free

Theories, Facts and Mind Games
- Enthusing young minds to delight in understanding how lively plants really are

Presenter: Dr. Matthew Jebb,
Director of the National Botanic Gardens

*Participants will be enabled to engage in discussion and debate with Dr. Jebb during the question and answer session.

In this lecture Dr Jebb will explore how some of our greatest understandings of the world have come about through simple thought experiments. Not only are these highly informative ways of examining Nature, they are also highly appealing ways of teaching the application of logic in science. Newton, Einstein and Darwin were masters of such clear thinking. Zoology is often seen as easier to teach than Botany because animals are often thought of as more 'alive'. He will also explore some of the fundamental differences between animals and plants, with such questions as 'Why aren't animals photosynthetic?', and 'Do plants have senses?', and will explain why many of these are merely problems of our perception of the world being naturally more animal-centric and trapped in a particular time paradigm. He will use both classic as well as a few new thought experiments to show how the origin of life, the 'intelligence' of plants and the classification of living things are all concepts that can be debated in a logical and lively manner.

 

About the Speaker

Dr. Matthew Jebb is the Director of the National Botanic Gardens since 2010. Matthew gained his primary degree in Botany at Oxford University, where he also pursued his PhD on the Tuber morphology and taxonomy of the rubiaceous Ant-Plants. Following this Matthew returned to Papua New Guinea, where he had conducted his research for his PhD, and was made Director of the Christensen Research Institute from 1987 to 1993. He continued his taxonomic interests on a range of tropical plant groups from South east Asia, including the Pitcher plants (Nepenthes), Screw-pines (Pandanus) and ant-plants (Myrmecodia, Hydnophytum and Anthorrhiza) as well as publishing articles on coral reef ecology, fish taxonomy, climatic history of the south pacific and wasp predation of spiders.

Before joining the staff of the National Botanic Gardens in 1996, he was a post-doctoral researcher at Trinity College, working on the Ivy family (Araliaceae) of Thailand. Matthew was the Keeper of the Herbarium and Taxonomist (Ainmneoir Plandai) at the Gardens since 1998. In 2005 Matthew was nominated by Ireland as the European vice-president on the bureau of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. This role culminated at the Eighth meeting of the Conference of the Parties in Curitiba, Brazil in March 2006. The Convention is one of the United Nations Environment Program's most significant bodies for the conservation of nature at a global scale, and has been ratified by more countries than any other international convention.

Matthew is currently Chairman of PlantNetwork, the Plant Collections Network of Britain and Ireland, which represents nearly 100 of the leading plant collections in these islands and provides training and collaborative activities. He is also chair of the Praeger Committee of the Royal Irish Academy, which promotes the noble tradition of field natural history by non-professionals through representation at the Academy and the provision of annual grants in support of fieldwork.

His current research interests are varied, and include the Irish flora - its origins and conservation, the flora of Clare Island, and other small island floras, as well as taxonomic revisions of the genus Hydnophytum and studies on the phylogeny and biogeography of Nepenthes.


For further information please contact:
Dr. Maeve Liston
PRO of the IBioLI
Email: maeve.liston@mic.ul.ie
Phone: (061) 774726

 

Getting there

  • Bus No 4; Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook)
  • Bus No 9; Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd., O'Connell St., Botanic Rd., Beneavin Rd., Charlestown)
  • Bus No 83; Kimmage, Sundrive Rd., Rathmines / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

GPS users: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53
or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

In collaboration with NCE-MSTL and The National Botanic Gardens, Dublin

 

Botanic gardens logo NCE MSTL logo OPW Logo

 


As part of the celebration of its Golden Jubilee The Institute of Biology of Ireland invites its members, families, friends and members of the public, in conjunction with Burrenbeo Trust (www.burrenbeo.com) to a walk on Sunday, August 3rd in the heart of the Burren, Co Clare.

‘August at the Lough’

With Harry Jeuken
3rd August, 2014
2.15pm @ Gortlecka Cross 51R 304 945


Join us for a ramble in the Burren along the Lough Avalla loop walk and catch the last of the summer blossoms. Harry Jeuken is the landowner at Lough Avalla and has a wealth of knowledge of the holy wells, the winterage, and the story of the local land. Harry and his family are certified organic farmers and also farm biodynamically. Amongst other things Harry's family make cheese from their own goat herd.  The walk will take us on a tour of the land farmed by Harry and his family taking a look at the archaeology, geology, botany, history and agriculture of the area.

While not strenuous, this can be challenging terrain - walking on limestone pavement which can be slippery when wet. The walk will take c. 2 ½ - 3 hours and will be followed by an optional trip to the farmhouse for tea and cake (for an extra donation - €5 suggested). Due to presence of livestock on the land no dogs are allowed on the walk.

Meeting time of 2.15pm at Gortlecka Cross or you can take the 2pm NPWS bus from Corofin and meet us there. This walk is open to everyone.  However, it is free for Burrenbeo Trust Members and a donation of €5 is suggested from non-members. It is also free to members of the Institute of Biology of Ireland as the Institute will carry the cost involved(membership cards, please on the day).

Please bring good walking shoes and waterproofs, if needed. For more information please email trust@burrenbeo.com or phone 091 638096. 

 

Directions

From the North (Kinvara)
Leaving Kinvara head West along the N67 and take the first turn left after c.500m. Drive c.4km along the road keeping left, passing the graveyard, until you reach a 4-way crossroads (signposted for the Burren perfumery). Go straight through and drive on for c.2.5km, then keep left when you get to a fork. Follow this road for another c.4km then you get to a T-junction, take a left, after c.2km take a right then drive straight for another c.4.5km and you will reach Gortlecka Cross. Park here.


From the West (Ballyvaughan)
Drive South on the N67 from Ballyvaughan. After c.1.5km take a left towards Poulnabrone Dolmen on the R480. Carry on straight for approximately for c.13kms until you pass Leamaneagh Castle. Take a left here on the R476 for c.4.5kms. In Kilnaboy village turn left for another c.2km, then left again for another c.2kms. Here you will reach Gortlecka Cross. Park here.


From the East (Crusheen)
Drive through Crusheen and after 1.2km past the village take the first left turn (signposted for Tubber). Drive straight through for c.8kms, passing Tubber) until you reach a 4-way crossroads (signposted for the Burren perfumery). Take a left turn here onto the R460. Drive on for c.5.5kms then take the second turn right. Follow this road for less than c.1kms. Here you will reach the base of Mullaghmore. Continue along until you get to a crossroads. Park here.


From the South (Corofin- Kilfenora)
Travel to the village of Kilnaboy on the R476 northwards from Corofin, which is c.4km. In Kilnaboy village turn right for another c.2kms, then left again for just under 3kms. Here you will reach Gortlecka Cross. Park here.

Looking forward to meeting IBIOLI members,families and their friends.


Frank McGourty
Secretary, IBIOLI
Email: info@ibioli.net


Guided tour of Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens, East Wicklow

Picture of Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens

Saturday, July 5th 2014 at 2pm.
Participants meet at the Car Park


As part of the celebration of its Golden Jubilee The Institute of Biology of Ireland invites its members, families, friends and general public to Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens, for a Free guided Tour.

 

About Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens

Located in east County Wicklow, Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens is the centrepiece of an 18th century estate that once covered over 5000 acres (2000 ha). Seat of the Acton family for three centuries, it is now an outpost of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin. The milder climate, higher rainfall and deeper, acidic soils of this historic Wicklow garden, provide a counterpoint to the collections at Glasnevin. The association of Kilmacurragh with the National Botanic Gardens began in 1854, when Thomas Acton inherited the estate and greatly benefited from the advice and support of Dr. David Moore and his son Sir Frederick Moore, Curators of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin in Dublin.

Kilmacurragh provided a more advantageous situation for growing plants from the Himalaya and the Southern Hemisphere and is today famous for its conifers and calcifuges.

In 1996, a 52 acre (21 ha) portion of the old demesne comprising the house, arboretum, entrance drive and woodlands officially became part of the National Botanic Gardens of Ireland. By then the house was in ruins due to a series of disastrous fires in and the following ten years were spent rescuing valuable trees from a crippling tangle of cherry laurel, sycamore and Rhododendron ponticum. (from National Botanic Gardens Web site, www.botanicgardens.ie).

 

Getting to Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens

The gardens are located south of Dublin in east Wicklow, just 3km from the N11 road, between Wicklow town and Rathdrum.

If driving South from Dublin on the N11, you need to turn right at the Beehive pub, which lies c.3 km after the second junction to Rathnew/Wicklow, this is also c.1km South of where the dual carriageway turns to single carriageway.

Keep to the main route, and you will find the entrance on your left after 5 km.

If driving FROM the south on the N11, take the first left after Lil Doyles, a bit less than a kilometre further on, at The Tap pub. Drive c. 2 1/2 km to a T-junction and turn left. The arboretum is 300m on your left.

If driving from Rathdrum, leave the village on the R752, signposted as Deputys' Pass. After 4km turn right and after a further 2.5km you will come to a T-junction. Turn right and the arboretum is on your left after c. 1km.


GPS users

  • either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: SLP-21-LP9
  • or input the following latitude 52.9341 and longitude -6.1529.


For further information
on National Botanic Gardens, Kilmacurragh, go to www.botanicgardens.ie/kilmac/kilmhome.htm

To facilitate with our planning, please advise if you plan to join us on the day (give the number of persons in the group), by emailing info@ibioli.net.

Looking forward to meeting you there

Frank McGourty
Hon. Secretary,
Institute of Biology of Ireland


Environmental and Field Biology Course,
Inis Meáin
(Inishmaan), Aran Islands

Saturday, June 14th 2014 at 10.30am.
Participants meet at the Church

(Possibly also on Sunday 15th, see below)*

As part of the celebration of its Golden Jubilee The Institute of Biology of Ireland invites its members, families, friends and general public to Inis Meáin (Inishmaan), Aran for an Environmental and Field Biology Course.

The Course will be facilitated by Institute of Biology of Ireland member Dr Con O’Rourke (Ex Teagasc). Dr O’Rourke has a very long association with the study of the natural and man-made resources of the Aran Islands. He is a widely published scientist and in recent years has published Nature Guide to the Aran Islands (Lilliput Press, 2006), and Dúlra Oileáin Arann (Cois Life, 2011); both publications were supported by the Institute of Biology of Ireland.

This course, involving a blend of Gaeilge and English, will be conducted in the outdoor natural environment taking in various sites of historical, geological, cultural, natural science and general environmental interests; please come prepared for the vagrancies of island weather (waterproof clothing), and walking over the island terrain of limestone pavements, pathways and narrow roads (comfortable clothes and walking gear).

The course is free to IBIOLI members. However, a small contribution of €5 for non-members will be collected on the day.

*Should the course be over subscribed for the Saturday (we can cater for maximum of 40 on the day), we will re-run the course on Sunday, same time, and same location. In the attached form, please indicate if you are willing to be assigned to Sunday should that situation arise. We will do our best to please everyone, but reserve the right to re-assign, should the need arise.

About Inishmaan
Inishmaan, or Inis Meáin, is Aran’s Middle Island. It is the quietest of the three Aran Islands and a place to escape the crowds.

A maze of narrow winding roads, sheltered paths and trails criss-cross the island, from the rocky hillsides of the south to the deserted sandy beaches on the north shore. Wild flowers bloom everywhere and numerous examples of early settlements dot the limestone karst landscape.

The incredible oval fort of Dún Chonchúir can be found here and so too are the beautiful Cill Cheanainn and the church of Mary Immaculate with its magnificent stained glass windows by the famed Harry Clarke Studios. Nearby is Teach Synge, the restored island cottage of writer John Millington Synge, for whom the island was a favourite retreat.

Inishmaan, or Inis Meáin island hosts a centre, running renowned Irish language and culture courses, where you can learn about the history and traditions of the island from music and poetry to set dancing and ecology.

Inishmaan, or Inis Meáin is also home to the award winning Inis Meáin restaurant and guest suites. Drop in for an extraordinary dining experience. The main ingredients used in this restaurant are sourced on the island itself, including lobster and crab caught by local fishermen from currachs, the traditional island fishing boats.

Accommodation

Check out the website for Failte Ireland approved accommodation
http://www.discoverireland.ie/Ireland-s-Islands/The-Aran-Islands/Inishmaan-Inis-Meain.

In addition, see below a “Liosta Lóistin” ** on Inishmaan (Inis Meáin) kindly provided by Dr O’Rourke.

Food
We have a wish that the group would come together for an evening meal/dinner on Saturday night in Wilma's (Tigh Conghaile,099-73085, bbinismeain@gmail.com). The diner’s choice is chicken or locally caught fish.
But Wilma will need to have a fairly firm idea of numbers and of diners’ choices of either chicken or fish a few days in advance. So please give me this information on the attached form.

Travel

  • Ferry from Ros a’ Mhíl (Rossaveal), Co Galway, please check with www.aranislandferries.com. Free travel passes accepted.
  • Ferry from Doolin, Co Clare, please check with http://www.doolinferries.com  (Also check if free travel passes are accepted to Inis Meáin (Inishmaan)).
  • By Air from Inverin, Co. Galway, please check with www.aerarannislands.ie. Fare is €49 return per person, group rate (4 or more) €44. Holders of a free travel pass, €15 per person, return. Departs Inverin on Fridays and Saturdays at 9am, 10.30am, 4.30pm. Returns Sat 9.15am and 4.45pm and Sundays 10.15am and 4.45pm. Please check aerarann web site above for Galway bus connection times (€3 per person, single journey)

 

Make this a weekend to remember. Travel to the Island on Friday evening and be ready to join us on the field course at 10.30am on Saturday.

**

Liosta Lóistin

 

Reply Form

Please email us at info@ibioli.net or phone Frank McGourty on 087 283 2787 by 2pm this Tuesday (June 3rd) with  the information sought below

The information required is:

Name (for contact only):
Email address:
Mobile number (optional):
2014 IBIOLI membership number:                        Non-member of IBIOLI:
Willing to take course on Sunday, if over subscribed on Saturday:
Dinner, Wilma’s restaurant, Saturday night:      Choice: Chicken/Fish

If accompanied by a spouse, partner, friend, etc., just add in the total numbers

  • Participating in the course
  • availing of dinner at Wilma’s on Saturday night
  • diner’s choices (fish or chicken) at Wilma’s (numbers of each).

Indicate any other dietary requirements of you or members of your group.

Thank you
Frank McGourty
Secretary, IBIOLI

 


 

Golden Jubilee Year, 2014
Institute of Biology of Ireland

Double event in Dublin at the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin and at Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum

As part of the celebrations of the Golden Jubilee Year of the Institute of Biology of Ireland, the Institute is organising a number of special events this year.

The first of these events takes place on Saturday May 17th. The Institute invites members, their families and friends, for a double event in Dublin at the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin and at Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum.

It will be an opportunity for members to get together in the beautiful surroundings of the National Botanic Gardens. You may opt for one or both of the guided tours.

Please email us at info@ibioli.net letting us know approximately how many of your family & friends will be attending with you and whether you will be attending one or both tours.

In association with the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin the Institute has organised a Guided tour of the Gardens to begin at 2pm in the Reception Areas of the National Botanic Gardens. If you have not been there before they are well worth a visit and if you have not been there for a while they’re well worth going back to! There is a nominal charge of €2 per person for all non-members of the Institute for the guided-tour. Please remember to take your membership cards with you. For full directions to the Gardens please see the directions on the http://www.botanicgardens.ie/educ/gettingthere.htm website.

Following the guided-tour of the Gardens there will be complimentary tea / coffee and light refreshments at 3.45pm (approximately) in the restaurant area.

If members wish there is also an earlier fascinating guided tour of Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum.  The Institute has arranged a tour to begin there at the earlier time of 11:30, meeting in the Cemetery and Museum Reception Area. Unfortunately the Institute cannot sponsor this tour as there is a cost of €12/person (or €7/person for groups of 10 or more. Hopefully there will be enough members & family to avail of the lower price). Please see details of Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum at www.glasnevintrust.ie.

Following the Cemetery & Museum tour, members can move through the linking gates for the guided tour of the National Botanic Gardens.


Other Institute of Biology of Ireland Golden Jubilee events will include a number of rocky-shore tours throughout the country. Please see the attached notice and further information will be posted on our www.ibioli.net website as the details become available.

Message for your diary:

IBIOLI will facilitate a FREE guided tour of  the National Botanic Gardens, Kilmacurragh Wood, Kilbride, Co Wicklow on July 5th, at 12 noon.

See http://www.botanicgardens.ie/kilmac/kilmhome.htm.

(Extract from the National Botanic Gardens Web site)
Located in east County Wicklow, Kilmacurragh Botanic Gardens is the centrepiece of an 18th century estate that once covered over 5000 acres (2000 ha). Seat of the Acton family for three centuries, it is now an outpost of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin. The milder climate, higher rainfall and deeper, acidic soils of this historic Wicklow garden, provide a counterpoint to the collections at Glasnevin. The association of Kilmacurragh with the National Botanic Gardens began in 1854, when Thomas Acton inherited the estate and greatly benefited from the advice and support of Dr. David Moore and his son Sir Frederick Moore, Curators of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin in Dublin.

Kilmacurragh provided a more advantageous situation for growing plants from the Himalaya and the Southern Hemisphere and is today famous for its conifers and calcifuges.

In 1996, a 52 acre (21 ha) portion of the old demesne comprising the house, arboretum, entrance drive and woodlands officially became part of the National Botanic Gardens of Ireland. By then the house was in ruins due to a series of disastrous fires in and the following ten years were spent rescuing valuable trees from a crippling tangle of cherry laurel, sycamore and Rhododendron ponticum.


You are invited to a keynote Public Lecture* in

The National Botanic Gardens (Lecture Theatre),
Botanic Rd., Dublin 9

Wednesday, November 13th 2013, at 8:00pm.
Admission: Free

What can bats teach people about health, wealth and long life?

Speaker: Professor Emma Teeling, School of Biology and Environmental Sciences, UCD .


*Participants will be enabled to engage in discussion and debate with Prof. Teeling during the question and answer session.


Getting there

  • Bus No 4; Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook)
  • Bus No 9; Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd., O'Connell St., Botanic Rd., Beneavin Rd., Charlestown)
  • Bus No 83; Kimmage, Sundrive Rd., Rathmines / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

Getting there: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53
or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

 

For further information please contact:
Dr. Maeve Liston
NCE-MSTL (Mary Immaculate College)
Email: maeve.liston@mic.ul.ie
Phone: (061) 774726


About the Speaker

Professor Emma Teeling

Professor Emma Teeling has a BSc in Zoology from UCD and an MSc in Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. She received her PhD from Queen's University Belfast in Molecular Phylogenetics and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, USA.

Professor Teeling is a Professor in the School of Biology and Environmental Science there. She was the recipient of the President of Ireland Young Researcher Award and is currently the holder of a European Research Council Starting grant.

(In collaboration with NCE-MSTL and The National Botanic Gardens, Dublin)


You are invited to a keynote Public Lecture* in

The National Botanic Gardens (Lecture Theatre),
Botanic Rd., Dublin 9

Wednesday, October 16th 2013, at 8:00pm.
Admission: Free

60 years of DNA: what next?

Speaker: Prof. David McConnell, Professor of Genetics, Trinity College, Dublin.


*Symposium participants will be enabled to engage in discussion and debate with Prof. David McConnell during the question and answer session.


Getting there

  • Bus No 4; Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd., Blackrock, Stradbrook)
  • Bus No 9; Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd., O'Connell St., Botanic Rd., Beneavin Rd., Charlestown)
  • Bus No 83; Kimmage, Sundrive Rd., Rathmines / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

Getting there: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53
or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

 

For further information please contact:
Dr. Maeve Liston
Mary Immaculate College & NCE-MSTL
Email: maeve.liston@mic.ul.ie
Phone: (061) 774726


About the Speaker

Professor David McConnell

Professor of Genetics, Trinity College, Dublin.

David McConnell, a molecular geneticist, is Professor of Genetics at Trinity College Dublin. He is a member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation and the Royal Irish Academy. He received his PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 1971, and held an Eleanor Roosevelt Research Fellowship at Harvard University in 1976-77. He pioneered the development of molecular genetics and genetic engineering in Ireland, participating in several EC biotechnology programmes, and collaborating with ICI, Guinness, Schering Plough, Biocon, BP and NovoNordisk in various biotechnology projects. He planned and led the development of the Smurfit Institute of Genetics, a leading centre for research and teaching of genetics. He was a founding participant in the Yeast Genome Project. He advised UNIDO on many projects, and was Chairman of the Selected Committee which reported on the location of the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology. Formerly Vice Provost of Trinity College, he was a member of the Irish Council for Science Technology and Innovation and Chairman of The Irish Times Trust.

(In collaboration with NCE-MSTL and The National Botanic Gardens, Dublin)

 


Institute of Biology of Ireland Seminar

Professor Donal O'Shea (Consultant Endocrinologist), St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin

Title:
“Obesity and the immune system – murmurations on a theme”


Date:
Thursday 11th April 2013
Time: 7.30 pm

Venue:
AM150 Mairtin O’Tnuthail Theatre in the Arts Millennium Building, NUI Galway

(See http://nuigalway.ie/campus-map/images/nuigalway_campusmap_3000.jpg for a map of the location)

Hosted by Dr Maura Grealy, Dept of Pharmacology and Therapeutics

 

Professor O’Shea is a consultant endocrinologist at St Vincent’s University and St Columcille’s Hospitals, Dublin, where he runs a hospital-based multidisciplinary treatment unit for the management of adult obesity. He chaired the Detection and Treatment subgroup of the National Obesity Taskforce in 2005, chairs the nutrition council of the Irish Heart Foundation and was appointed associate Professor of Medicine in UCD in 2007. He is a member of the Department of Health special action group on obesity established in 2011 and chaired the health impact assessment group on the potential benefits and harms of a tax on sugar sweetened drinks.
His work was recently highlighted in RTE’s ‘The Obesity Clinic’ and he is a consultant to ‘Operation Transformation’.


Biology for Today:

Biotechnology for life

Symposium for second level biology students
With the NCE-MSTL & IBioI

The aim of the symposium is to enrich students’ experience of Biology and Agricultural Science topics. It will also provide them with additional insights into Biotechnology for life. It offers an opportunity to students to appreciate the outcomes of the most up-to-date research in the various biological topics.

Prof John Breen
Department of Life Science, University of Limerick
The Ecology of Ants and Bees

Dr John Morrissey
Department of Microbiology, University College Cork.
Yeasts in Biotechnology: Small Beer or Big Business?

Prof Sean Arkins
Department of Life Science, University of Limerick
Antibodies: Universal Defense Proteins

Dr Eibhlis O Connor
Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick
Healthy Diet, Healthy Life

Date: 8th February 2013
Time 10.00am to 12.45pm
Location: Concert Hall, University of Limerick
Fee: €5 per student

Reservations: Contact Helen Fitzgerald on 061-234786
email: Helen.Fitzgerald@ul.ie
or Alison Cullinane on 061-234916
email: Alison.Cullinane@ul.ie

www.ncemstl.ie

 

 

Talk Information

Prof John Breen - UL
The Ecology of Ants and Bees
Ecology is a very important part of the Leaving Cert Syllabus. This talk will give an insight into the ecological principles and practical ecology using examples from ants and bees. Ants show some nice examples of symbiosis. How do we estimate the population size of colonies? How do we compare the bee populations in different habitats? If there is a decline in bee biodiversity, should we be worried? And, how do we know if a species is native to Ireland?

Dr John Morrissey - UCC
Yeasts in Biotechnology: Small Beer or Big Business?
Biotechnology is one of the most important industries in modern society. It includes diverse topics – ranging from vaccines and pharmaceuticals to food and drinks. Micro-organisms are especially important for biotechnology and have been used for this purpose by society for thousands of years. This talk will focus on one such microbe, yeast. We will review how yeast was first domesticated by ancient societies and continues to be used today in multiple industrial sectors. The importance of genetics, evolution and genetic engineering will also be discussed.

Prof Sean Arkins - UL
Antibodies: Universal Defense Proteins
Substances foreign to the body, such as bacteria and viruses and other infectious agents are recognized by the body's immune system as invaders. Our natural defences against these infectious agents include antibodies.  Antibodies are large proteins, found predominantly in the blood. They have some very important functions. Antibodies identify dangerous ‘foreign objects’ in the blood, such as bacteria and viruses. Antibodies are extremely specific; that is, each antibody binds to and attacks one particular foreign antigen. They are central to the immune systems of humans and animals. This presentation will discuss how antibodies are made, how they recognize foreign from self and how they help the body to maintain the integrity of the body.

Dr Eibhlis O Connor - UL
Healthy Diet, Healthy Life!
Global trends in nutrition are shaping public health both nationally and internationally. This presentation will overview the main nutritional public health concerns relating specifically to adolescent health, focusing on the obesity epidemic and its impact on chronic disease incidence including type 2 diabetes and longer term associated risks including cancer.


You are invited to a keynote Public Symposium* in

The National Botanic Gardens (Lecture Theatre),
Botanic Rd., Dublin 9
Thursday, November 22nd 2012, at 8pm.


Current and Future Trends in Agricultural
Food Production

Keynote Topics:
Global Challenges of population, food, energy and
climate change – future prospects

Speaker: Prof. Jimmy Burke, Masstock Professor of Crop Science, UCD

In Defence of Genetically Modified (GM) Foods
Speaker: Prof. Mike Gibney, Director, Institute of Food and Health, UCD

Symposium participants will be enabled to engage in discussion and debate with the
presenters during the question and answer session.

* (In collaboration with NCE-MSTL, University of Limerick, and The National Botanic Gardens, Dublin)

 

About the Topics
The topics will focus on creating a greater awareness of these topical concerns among members of the general public and will be of particular appeal to those with a technical, professional, commercial, educational, or specific interest in global food production, including the impact of modern technological applications.

 

Speaker Information

Professor Jimmy Burke
Prof. Burke studied at NUIG, UCD, University of California, and Leeds University, and has the following degrees: B.Agr.Sc (1976), M.Agr.Sc (1977), and PhD (1980). He has worked for the University of California at Davis, the Irish Department of Agriculture and Food, The Agricultural Institute, and with Teagasc, where he has held many senior roles including, Chief Crops Scientist, and National Programme Leader for Crops, Horticulture and Forestry Research. From 2001 to 2010 he was Head of the National Crops Research Centre at Oak Park, Carlow where he had responsibility for all aspects of crop sciences including bioenergy and alternative uses of crops. In June 2011, he was appointed to the Masstock Chair in Crop Science at UCD. He is also an adjunct Professor at both NUIM and TCD. His major interests include developing new and improved crop production systems for arable crops as well as plant response to environmental stress and climate change. He has been involved in the development of new biotechnological approaches for plant improvement and bioenergy. He has published many research articles in various scientific journals and co-authored a textbook on Biotechnology with Prof. Newell McGloughlin of the University of California at Davis. He has served on many boards and advisory committees relating to agriculture, biotechnology and bioenergy.

Professor Michael Gibney
Prof. Gibney, MAgrSc, MA, PhD, is Professor of Food and Health and Director of The Institute of Food and Health, UCD. He is a former President of the Nutrition Society. He served on the EU Scientific Committee for Food from 1985 to 1997 and then chaired the BSE working group as a Member of the Scientific Steering Committee of the EU from 1997 to 2000. He is a member of the scientific advisory committee of the Sackler Institute of Nutrition of the New York Academy of Sciences, and has served on several
WHO and FAO committees. His research interests lie in metabolic and molecular nutrition, in public health nutrition, and in probabilistic risk analysis.

He is presently the coordinator of a major EU funded (€9m) research project on personalised nutrition (www.food4me.org) and is also coordinator of a major nationally funded (€12m) project on “The National Nutrition Phenotype Database” (www.facebook.com/jingoproject). Prof. Gibney has served on the Faculties of the University of Sydney, the University of Southampton, and Trinity College Dublin. He has published over 250 peer- reviewed papers.

 

For further information please contact: Alison Cullinane NCE-MSTL
Email: alison.cullinane@ul.ie
or
call (061)234916

Getting there

  • Bus No 4; Harristown, Ballymun, Botanic Ave., Phibsboro Shopping Centre, O'Connell St., Pembroke Rd.,
    Blackrock, Stradbrook)
  • Bus No 9; Limekiln Ave. South Circular Rd., O'Connell St., Botanic Rd., Beneavin Rd., Charlestown)
  • Bus No 83; Kimmage, Sundrive Rd., Rathmines / Harristown {Ballygall Road East})

GPS users: Either use the Garmin loc8 system with this code: NP7-57-F53
or input the following latitude, 53.3717, and longitude, -6.2696.

 

OPW logo NCE MSTL logo National Botanic Gardens Logo

 


Biology for Today:
Biotechnology for life
Symposium for second level biology students
With the
NCE-MSTL & IOBI

The aim of the symposium is to help students with difficult concepts from the biology syllabus while also giving them added information beyond the scope of the syllabus. The talks are anchored in the Leaving Certificate syllabus and aim to enrich students’ knowledge of the course as well as engage and provide them with information of up to date research in various biological topics.

Dr Paul O’ Toole - UCC
Molecular Genetics and Genomics – Harnessing the power of DNA technology

Dr Pat Kiely – UL
Biology of Cancer

Dr Audrey O’ Grady – UL
Ecology Uncovered: What do ecologists do?

Dr Sean Fair - UL
The Use of Reproductive Biotechnologies in Human and Animal Fertility

19th January 2012
10.00am to 1.15pm
Fee €5 per student
Exact location within the University of Limerick will be confirmed at time of booking
Reservations: Contact Helen Fitzgerald on 061234786
email: Helen.Fitzgerald@ul.ie
or Alison Cullinane on 061234916
email: Alison.Cullinane@ul.ie


Speaker Information

Dr. Paul O’ Toole - UCC
Molecular Genetics and Genomics – Harnessing the power of DNA technology
It is now over 10 years since scientists sequenced the human genome, and this period has seen a quiet revolution in how many biological questions are now addressed. The availability of whole genetic blue-prints for humans, bacteria, animals and plants means that we can tackle ambitious projects aiming to exploit, cure, diagnose or modify many living organisms. This lecture will review how far we have come, and get beyond the hype to describe the many

Dr. Pat Kiely - UL
Biology of Cancer

This talk takes the audience on a journey right through the hallmarks of cancer, the causes, prevention and diagnosis and will describe how some cancer treatments work. Several different types of cancers will be discussed from breast cancer through to prostate cancer and leukaemia will also be discussed.

Dr. Audrey O’ Grady - UL
Ecology Uncovered: What do ecologists do?

Ecology accounts for a large portion of the leaving certificate syllabus and is a dead cert question every year, but do students really know what ecology is all about? This lecture will explore habitat types, methods used in ecology, and will introduce some of the weird and wondering organisms and their relationships in Irish habitats.

Dr. Sean Fair - UL
The Use of Reproductive Biotechnologies in Human and Animal Fertility

This talk will focus on how reproductive biotechnologies are being used in humans to treat infertility while technologies based on similar principles are being applied to farm animals to increase the rate of genetic gain and thus the profitability of farming systems. This talk aims to demonstrate how increasing our understanding of how the reproductive system works can be used to solve problems across a range of disciplines


“The Biology of Cancer” by Dr Patrick Kiely

Dr Patrick Kiely

Dr Kiely who was recently elected to the council of the Irish Association for Cancer Research (IACR) will deliver a talk entitled “The Biology of Cancer”. This talk is aimed at second level teachers and the general public and it is designed as an overview of the disease. It will take the audience on a journey right through the Hallmarks of cancer, the causes of cancer, cancer prevention and cancer diagnosis and will describe how some cancer treatments work. The primary focus is on Breast Cancer; however other cancers, such as prostate cancer and leukemia will also be discussed.

Dr Kiely will briefly describe the work being carried out by the researchers in his Laboratory in the University of Limerick who are trying to establish new therapeutic targets for cancer. Dr Kiely is a Lecturer in the Department of Life Sciences, UL and is Principal Investigator of the Laboratory of Cellular & Molecular Biology and a member of the Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI). This talk is in collaboration with the Institute of Biology of Ireland (IOBI) and the NCE-MSTL.

“The Biology of Cancer” will take place in the NCE-MSTL lecture room, A1-065
in the Main Building, University of Limerick, on the 20th of October 2011 at 7pm

To book a place contact Ms Helen Fitzgerald by telephone on 061-234786
or email Helen.Fitzgerald@ul.ie



IOBI 2011 AGM and Keynote Lecture

The Institute invites all members to the 2011 AGM

Friday 24th June at 7.00pm,

Stillorgan Park Hotel, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 18.

Keynote Lecture: Open to members and non-members

Time: 8.00pm

Place: Stillorgan Park Hotel

Title: “Dentistry in the Molecular Age: Success from Biology”

Speaker: Professor Brian O'Connell,
Professor of Restorative Dentistry, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Trinity College Dublin.

The lecture will cover issues about stem cells, bioengineering and some genetic topics and will of interest for the non-dental and dental audience alike.

** As places will be limited, and in order to secure a place, although not necessary, we would advise that you forward your name to info@ibioli.net



Twenty-seven Years of Biology Today ‘as Gaeilge’

Inis Meáin
Inis Meáin ón aeir

Lectures and field forays, ‘as Gaeilge’, for about 300 trainee primary teachers will be held in Inis Meáin, Aran Islands, on April 20th-21st and June 17th-18th this year.
The Aran Islands are an extension of the Burren, with a similar unique flora, but also Astragalus danicus, a Protected Species found in Ireland only on the islands. The bedrock geology is fossil-rich carboniferous limestone, strewn with granite and sandstone ‘glacial erratics’ dragged over from Connemara during the Ice Age. Winter grazing forms part of the farming system; this limits sward height and allows delicate Burren species such as gentians to flower during late Spring-early Summer.
Con O’Rourke (ex Teagasc), Éanna Ní Lamhna (Former President, An Taisce), Prof. John Breen (Universy of Limerick), Aisling Nic An tSithigh (Dublin Naturalists’ Field Club) and Diarmuid McAree (former Chief Inspector, Forestry) will expound on the geology, flora, fauna and farming practices of the local (Burren) environment. The presentations are relevant to the primary schools Science curriculum and should serve as a useful model for the trainee teachers.

The Institute of Biology of Ireland has been running ‘Biology Today’ programmes for second-level students during the school year since the 1950s. In the late 1970s the then Chair of the Institute, Dr Derek Goodhue , suggested that some of these programmes, rather than being held indoors in winter, should involve lectures and outdoor field forays in summer.

Éanna Ní Lamhna
Éanna Ní Lamhna (i lár) ag teaspáint flóra Inis Meáin do ábhair-múinteoirí.

The thousands of schoolchildren in Gaeltacht summer colleges suggested a possible target audience (provided all ‘gnó’ could be ‘déanta i nGaeilge’). Since 1984, programmes were organised annually, initially in all three Aran Islands for second-level students, but more recently for trainee primary teachers on their required Gaeltacht stints in Inis Meáin. Arising from the Aran programmes, and supported by the Institute of Biology of Ireland, “Nature Guide to the Aran Islands” (The Lilliput Press) was published in 2006, followed by an expanded Irish-language version (Dúlra Oileáin Árann) for publication by Cois Life in 2011.

Those with a reasonable level of spoken Irish and who are interested in participating in future Aran programmes should contact Dr Con O’Rourke, 16C Park Lane, Sandymount, Dublin 4, Tel. 01-269 7537, Fón póca 086 886 55464, e-mail: corourke7@eircom.net   


The Institute of Biology of Ireland are proud to present Professor Roland Clift CBE FREng FIChemE HonFCIWEM FRSA, Emeritus Professor of Environmental Technology in the Centre for Environmental Strategy (D3) at the University of Surrey. His topic will be


Bioenergy - and why biofuels for transport are nonsense

When? Wednesday 25th May at 12noon

Where? Dublin City University, Room XG19 in the School of Biotechnology.

All are Welcome

How do you get there? For directions please see
http://www.dcu.ie/info/get_to.shtml

For a map of the campus and venue location please see http://www.dcu.ie/images/campus_map.pdf
The venue is marked with an “X” (The Science Building)

 

© 2012 Institute of Biology of Ireland

 

 

 

Events Non-Institute events